Oral Health Group

Over-the-Counter Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen in Combination are Superior to Each Agent Alone in Treating Postoperative Pain


November 1, 2011
by ken

Sorry about the length but as I’ve indicated in the past…….no archive, no Word Press…..SOB!!!!!  Also can’t paste Dr. Wynn’s image – sharp looking dude, again NO WORD PRESS………..SOBBBB!!!!!


http://www.lexi.com/individuals/dentistry/images/wynn.jpg

Dr. Richard L. Wynn is Professor of Pharmacology at the
University of Maryland Dental School. He holds a BS degree in Pharmacy and a
PhD degree in Pharmacology. He chaired the Department of Pharmacology at the
University of Maryland Dental School from 1980 to 1995. He is the lead author
of the Drug Information Handbook for Dentistry,a co-author on many other
dental drug publications, an author of over 300 refereed scientific journal
articles, a consultant to the Academy of General Dentistry, a featured
columnist, and a featured speaker presenting more than 500 courses in
continuing dental education. One of his primary interests continues to be
keeping dental professionals informed of all aspects of drug use in dental
practice.

The first two reports (Derry, et al and Toms, et al) describe
the efficacy of single doses of ibuprofen and single doses of acetaminophen
for postoperative pain, compared to placebo in well-controlled trials. The
third report (Mehlisch, et al) describes the analgesic benefits of the
combination of the two agents (compared with each drug alone), again in
well-controlled trials. These studies provide further evidence-based
information for the rational use of over-the-counter pain relievers for
postoperative dental pain.

Study #1 Assessing the efficacy of single dose
over-the-counter ibuprofen

Derry C, Derry S, Moore RA, et al, “Single Dose Oral
Ibuprofen for Acute Postoperative Pain in Adults,” Cochrane
Database Syst Rev
,
 2009, July 8, (3) CD001548.

The objective of this study was to assess the analgesic
efficacy of ibuprofen in single oral doses for moderate and severe
postoperative pain in adults. The method was to search the Cochrane Library,
CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies
to May, 2009. Selection of studies considered for review was based on
randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of single-dose orally
administered ibuprofen in adults with moderate to severe acute
postoperative pain. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and
converted to outcomes of numbers of participants with at least 50% pain
relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit
(NNT) were calculated. The number of participants using rescue medication
over specified time periods, and the time to rescue medication, were sought
as additional measures of efficacy. Finally, information on adverse events
and withdrawals was collected.

Results of the Derry, et al, study

The studies reviewed totaled 72 and included 9,186
participants, in which ibuprofen was compared to placebo. The majority of
the studies used ibuprofen at 200 mg and 400 mg doses.

For at least 50% pain relief compared with placebo, the
number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit for ibuprofen 200 mg (2,690 participants)
was 2.7 (2.5 to 3.0) and for ibuprofen 400 mg (6,475 participants) it was
2.6 (2.4 to 2.6).

The proportion with at least 50% pain relief was 46% with 200
mg ibuprofen and 54% with 400 mg ibuprofen. Remedication within 6 hours was
less frequent with higher doses, with 48% remedicating with 200 mg and 42%
remedicating with 400 mg. The median time to remedication was 4.7 hours for
200 mg and 5.4 hours for 400 mg.

The studies using dental impaction pain models and soluble
ibuprofen salts (liquid gel capsule formulations) produced better efficacy
estimates. Adverse events were uncommon and no different from placebo.

The authors concluded a substantial amount of high quality
evidence demonstrated that over-the-counter ibuprofen is an effective pain
reliever in treating postoperative pain.

Study #2 Assessing the efficacy of single dose
over-the-counter acetaminophen

Toms L, McQuay HJ, Derry S, et al, “Single Dose Oral
Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) for Postoperative Pain in Adults,” Cochrane
Database Syst Rev,
 2008, Oct 8, (4) CD004602.

The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of
single dose oral acetaminophen for the treatment of acute postoperative
pain. The method was to search the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the
Oxford Pain Relief Database, and reference lists of articles to update data
from an existing version of the review. Selection of studies considered for
review was based on randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of
acetaminophen for acute postoperative pain in adults.

Area under the “pain relief versus time” curve was
used to derive the proportion of participants with acetaminophen or placebo
experiencing at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, using validated
equations. Number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit was calculated. The proportion
of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period and
time to use were sought as measures of duration of analgesia. Information
on adverse events and withdrawals was also collected.

Results of the Toms, et al, study

Fifty-one studies with 5,762 participants were included; of
those who took acetaminophen or placebo, 3,277 participants were treated
with a single oral dose of acetaminophen and 2,425 with placebo. About half
of the participants treated with acetaminophen at standard doses achieved
at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours compared with about 20% treated
with placebo.

Number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit for at least 50% pain relief
over 4 to 6 hours following a single 500 mg dose of acetaminophen was 3.5
(2.7 to 4.8); following a single 600 to 650 mg dose it was 4.6 (3.9 to5.5);
following a single dose of 975 to 1000 mg it was 3.6 ( 3.4 to 4.0).

About half the participants taking acetaminophen needed
additional analgesia over 4 to 6 hours compared with about 70% with
placebo.

Five people would need to be treated with 1000 mg
acetaminophen, the most commonly used dose, to prevent one needing rescue
medication over 4 to 6 hours, who would have needed it with placebo.

Reported adverse events were mild and transient, and occurred
at similar rates with 1000 mg acetaminophen and placebo. No serious adverse
events were reported.

The authors concluded that a single dose of acetaminophen
provided effective analgesia for about half of the patients with acute
postoperative pain for a period of about 4 hours and is associated with
few, mainly mild, adverse events.

Study #3 Assessing the efficacy of the combination of
over-the-counter ibuprofen and acetaminophen

Mehlisch DR, Aspley S, Daniels SE, et al, “Comparison of
the Analgesic Efficacy of Concurrent Ibuprofen and Paracetamol With
Ibuprofen or Paracetamol Alone in the Management of Moderate to Severe
Acute Postoperative Dental Pain in Adolescents and Adults: A Randomized,
Double-blind, Placebo-controlled, Parallel-group, Single-dose, Two-center,
Modified Factorial Study,” Clin Ther, 2010,
32:882-95.

This study was done to test the hypothesis that combination
analgesics may offer improved analgesic efficacy, particularly for moderate
to severe pain. The authors evaluated the analgesic benefits of concurrent
ibuprofen and paracetamol (acetaminophen), compared with each drug used
alone, in the management of acute postoperative dental pain.

Methods

The study enrolled healthy patients, ages 16 to 40 years,
undergoing surgical removal of 3 to 4 impacted molars. The protocol was a
randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, single-dose,
two center study. Patients were randomly assigned to ibuprofen 400
mg/acetaminophen 1000 mg combination, ibuprofen 200 mg/acetaminophen 500 mg
combination, ibuprofen 400 mg alone, acetaminophen 1000 mg alone, or
placebo when the postoperative pain reached moderate to severe intensity.

The primary endpoint of efficacy was the sum of pain relief
and pain intensity differences from 0 to 8 hours. Secondary endpoints
included total pain relief, sum of pain intensity differences, and sum of
pain intensity differences on the visual analog scale at various time
endpoints. Other analgesic measures included peak effect, onset and
duration of effect, and patients’ overall assessment of treatment. The
tolerability of study medicines was also assessed in terms of frequency and
nature of adverse events.

Results of the Mehlisch, et al, study

A total of 234 patients were randomly assigned to treatment
and included in the intent-to-treat population.

Results for the primary endpoint

For the sum of pain relief and pain intensity differences, the
group receiving the combination of ibuprofen 400 mg/acetaminophen 1000 mg
had significantly better mean scores compared with ibuprofen 400 mg alone,
acetaminophen 1000 mg alone and the combination of ibuprofen 200
mg/acetaminophen 500 mg.

For the sum of pain relief and pain intensity differences, the
group receiving the combination of ibuprofen 200 mg/acetaminophen 500 mg
had significantly better mean scores compared with acetaminophen 1000 mg
alone, but not compared to ibuprofen 400 mg alone.

Results for secondary endpoints

Ibuprofen 400 mg/acetaminophen 1000 mg was associated with
significantly better scores than was single agent therapy for total pain
relief, sum of pain intensity differences, and sum of pain intensity
differences on the visual analog scale at all time intervals, and for sum
of pain relief and pain intensity differences from 4 to 6 hours.

A breakdown of the Mehlisch, et al, data showed the following:

Time to the first confirmed perceptible pain relief for each
treatment was:

Ibuprofen 400 mg/acetaminophen 1000 mg: 23 minutes

Ibuprofen 200 mg/acetaminophen 500 mg: 22 minutes

Ibuprofen 400 mg: 49 minutes

Acetaminophen 1000 mg: 25 minutes

Placebo: 98 minutes

Time to the first meaningful pain relief for each treatment
was:

Ibuprofen 400 mg/acetaminophen 1000 mg: 94 minutes

Ibuprofen 200 mg/acetaminophen 500 mg: 74 minutes

Ibuprofen 400 mg: 124 minutes

Acetaminophen 1000 mg: 141 minutes

Placebo: 133 minutes

Time to pain half gone for each treatment was:

Ibuprofen 400 mg/acetaminophen 1000 mg: 70 minutes

Ibuprofen 200 mg/acetaminophen 500 mg: 86 minutes

Ibuprofen 400 mg: 114 minutes

Acetaminophen 1000 mg: 135 minutes

Placebo: 229 minutes

There were significant differences in favor of all active
treatments versus placebo for all efficacy endpoints. Adverse events were
similar across treatments, with the most frequent being nausea [26.1%
(61/234)], vomiting [18.8% (44/234)], headache [10.3% (24/234)], and
dizziness [8.1% (19/234)].

The authors concluded that concurrent ibuprofen and acetaminophen
appeared to provide significantly better analgesic efficacy compared with
either drug alone for management of acute postoperative dental pain.


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